Book Review: The Similars by Rebecca Hanover

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The Similars is a book by Rebecca Hanover on human clones.

The Similars is a thought provoking novel that gives you a glimpse about the possibility of human cloning. It strikes you with questions on science and society.

The story gives you a roller coaster ride on events. I must also compliment the development of the characters in the story because none of us can expect what they’ll be doing next.

The plot actually follows a usual sci-fi pattern: evil billionaire with a revengeful desire to take out his bullies from high school. I do hope the next books explain more of his side as I can’t just accept that this is all a childish plot, especially with the plot twist at the end. I also think that there is more to Darkwood’s history.

Throughout reading the novel, I have thought about human cloning and my side on it. I think, however the advancement we make on science and technology, that we shouldn’t play with genetics and create humans unnaturally as this would pave way to extreme enhancement that would make the gap between social classes bigger than it already is.

Technological advances are what keeps us moving forward as the human race as a whole, but maybe what keeps us human is our limitations. Are we still humans if we are allowed to surpass our standards and create abilities? Did we not hang people we were afraid of in the medieval times because of their difference, and because they were more than us? Perhaps now we are considering this option as we understand more, but maybe this will be our end.

I hope the next books explore more of the effect of cloning to the human race as a whole. I am excited to learn more.

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Book Review: The Handmaid’s Tale (Book 1) and The Testaments (Book 2) by Margaret Atwood

I try to steer away from the genre of books we were required to read for academic purposes because I read leisurely to escape the world- it’s quite a burden to be reading such materials that will expose the harshness of reality.

The thing about dystopian fiction is that there is a sliver of truth in each outcome. Everything is a possibility- whether it’s a civilization of aliens or robots, or a trip back to historic monarchies. The ideas of the plot are firstly outlined by the choices that we humans make this very moment. This is why the pull for reading it is strong; we relate to it closer that we do to fantasy fiction.

The Handmaid’s Tale is considered as a classic for modern fiction, and I never really had the desire to read it because of its status. However, such times requires us to expand our scope, and I must say that I do regret reading it because of the heavy feelings it gave me. The book, in general, exceeds my standards for writing and plot devising. The series starts with the story of Ofred, a Handmaid, whose sole duty is to bear a child for a couple of high standing in the society. Here, Gilead is a fictitious country formed in the America under the absolute control of a cult.

Imagine, the horror of such idea being paraded as a moral duty because of their ideals and religious beliefs. I cannot stress enough how each scene has made me shiver because of the possibilities they impose.

Why did I carry on to the Testaments?

The second book is a collection of testaments from subjects being studied from the old Gilead, now a destroyed country. It offers a glimpse into the rest of the world and what Gilead plays in it, and the starting piece on to how everything was brought down. It reminds me a lot about the situation of North Korea. I wonder how long will it be until we finally take action- but do we really have the judgment to do so?

Sometimes it makes you wonder if we indeed have the right to decide for other countries as a whole based on their status. We have seen how some of those decisions went, and most of the countries we have tried to decide for are now just war zones.

I am afraid. I am afraid that these books are indeed our testaments.

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Book Review: Supernova by Marissa Meyer (Book 3 of the Renegades Series)

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Just as I’ve thought that I have ran out of new subjects to read about, Marissa Meyer came up with the Renegades. Superheroes are indeed everywhere in the cinematic world as well as the long standing comics, but not much on Young Adult fiction. I was excited when I read about Meyer’s books, because she already had me hooked with the Lunar Chronicles series.

Supernova is the conclusion to the trilogy The Renegades (Book 2 Archenemies), about the Villain (Anarchist) Nova, who pretends to be a Hero (Renegade) to revenge on her family. She previously lived with the rest of her Anarchists while hiding her uncle, Ace Anarchy, the original villain, who was also captured on the end of Book Two: Archenemies, before Nova was given a chance to hand him back his helmet (which amplified his powers, which she stole from the Renegades.) She is also torn as she already finds herself falling for her Renegade Captain and teammate Adrian Everhart, also the adoptive son of Captain Chromium and the Dread Warden, the original Renegades who defeated Ace.

Nova has had a lot of progress during the first two books where she struggles with her inner morals. I was really excited about how they would end the series, but I have been disappointed as I feel like a lot of things were rushed and a lot of questions were unanswered. Meyer has long said that it is only a trilogy, but I think, based on the ending, that there will be a spin-off of some sort and I would be really upset if there wouldn’t be.

Just thought that the plot needed some much more spinning. I think Marissa wanted to move on from Nova’s story to highlight a new character, but I think it should have been two more books. Also, we’ve already guessed some of the things unveiled in the story based on the plot of the two books so I think it downgraded the effect of the revelations and fight scenes in most of the climax. I like Marissa’s style, I just hope she left some mystery that isn’t really obvious and opened it with a bang in Supernova. Honestly, the Epilogue is the only thing you wouldn’t have guessed, and this is why it needs more books.

I love it- but I wasn’t awed by it like the first time. I, however, still recommend the books to anyone who wants the old YA drama with a somewhat refreshed slate.

One cannot be brave who has no fear.

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