The Art of Lucid Dreaming

Every night, as my body falls asleep, my soul is awake, aware that it is in a dream. I usually see events unfold from a first person point of view with limited physical control, with my mind following the dream as it is to see if it has a message for me. I let the dream take over, and only interfere with it on times when I feel like I might be stuck in it or if it turns into a nightmare.

Facts say that we humans always dream, but most of us forget about it when we wake up. Ever since I was a kid, I would always have a recollection of what I have dreamed about the night before as I wake up every day. Sometimes I would get a whole episode, sometimes just fragments, although I cannot seem to remember everything. I have ignored this, thinking it was normal, and never questioned why my dreams seem to be real.

I don’t recall when I first heard about lucid dreaming, it’s just that I was amazed that there was a term for it and that it was rare. I researched about it over the years to fully understand it, there was even a time I tried to interpret almost every dream I would have. It made me more anxious and tired, as I would be stressing about what signs in my dream would mean and if it was bound to happen in my already challenging life. I learned that some people would even see themselves sleeping, and I was totally freaked when that first happened to me. I try not to do it again in fear of not being able to go back to my own body, I think that’s why most of my dreams are first person view. I don’t think I can even imagine what my reflection looks like in a dream, a defensive tactic I have developed to avoid seeing myself from another perspective.

The best dreams are the ones that seem so out of the world but yet feel so real. I have flown once, and I remember how vivid it was; how ecstatic the feeling of flying was like the superheroes I watch on TV. I remember waking up to aching legs, because in my dream the pressure of flying was made from one’s legs. I do not know how to swim in real life, but I had some dreams where I would be able to breathe underwater. I was living my fantasies while I slept.

However, as my eyes close and darkness captures me, it can also follow me into the other worlds I see. I have had encounters in which I had to force my physical body awake by thinking about which body parts I can easily move first, like my toes or fingers. I have tried to avoid these by not watching horror films before sleeping, as I tend to relive nightmares.

Perhaps lucid dreaming is my way of searching for the void I feel whenever I am awake, but the truth is sometimes I also yearn for a dreamless sleep where I can fully rest.  I don’t think I remember a time where I just.. slept.

 

 

Published by

Jeshea Lim

Jeshea is a writer who writes for lost souls waiting to be found, a demigod who has managed fairly on her own now that she is out of camp. She is now in the desert with her panda Cheng Shi who keeps the monsters at bay.

3 thoughts on “The Art of Lucid Dreaming”

  1. I lucid dream a lot too, and lately I’ve been lucid dreaming almost every night. My most ‘real’ dreams seem to precede similar events that happen in real life, although I might just be making this connection erroneously after the events happen.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s amazing, Josh. Most of the time my dreams don’t even make sense, it’s like being in a whole other world. However, isn’t it more fascinating how it happens to you in reality as well? I think if that was me I would be anxious, though, always trying to interpret my dreams.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It used to freak me out when my dreams actually happened in real life, but now I’m used to it. At first I did try to interpret all my dreams, which got annoying, but now I can kinda tell which ones I need to focus on: they feel different than ‘normal’ dreams, and I often remember them for weeks, months, or even years. Sometimes they recur a lot, too, and I can slip back into them when I’m awake but really tired or doing something monotonous. I should add, though, that these dreams are usually symbolic in nature (i.e. they don’t play out exactly like real-life events), so I can’t 100% say that they predict real events. Some of the similarities are freaky though.

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